Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

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Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Dr. Brandon
Administrator
It may seem strange that an assignment for a modern class would ask you to get outside; but, this is precisely what I want you to do.  It is one thing to read about the woods, Nature, and the role of the wilderness in getting in touch with the Romantic Sublime and one's "true self," but both Thoreau and Emerson would rather you get out and find this connection for yourself.  Ironically, although both men were authors, neither wanted you to fully trust books; they wanted you to trust yourself.

After reading Thoreau's essay, "Walking," I want you to consider disconnecting from the internet, leaving the ipod behind, and visiting Nature.  (Do bring your cell, as I want you to feel relaxed and safe.) One of the rallying cries of the modern environmental movement comes from the essay, "Walking," namely, "in Wildness is the preservation of the world."  In fact, "Walking," is considered one of the three seminal works on the role of Nature in our lives.  Emerson essay, Nature, is another one of the big three.  Thoreau and Emerson both thought that we disconnect ourselves from nature at a huge cost, and that in Nature we can find beauty, ideas, and rest which can allow us to fully discover ourselves.  For these Transcendentalist, American Romantics, Nature was a major source of the Sublime.  

I want you to consider following your instinct and finding a place to take a walk, to sit in nature, or to sit in the wilderness.  As Thoreau notes, the wild isn't hard to find; "Cities import it."  We call these spaces, "parks." There are national parks, city parks, and state parks scattered all around.  I want you to consider following your nose and finding a place to find the figurative "wilderness."  

How?  In the second part of "Walking," Thoreau says,

What is it that makes it so hard sometimes to determine whither we will walk? I believe that there is a subtile magnetism in Nature, which, if we unconsciously yield to it, will direct us aright. It is not indifferent to us which way we walk. There is a right way; but we are very liable from heedlessness and stupidity to take the wrong one. We would fain take that walk, never yet taken by us through this actual world, which is perfectly symbolical of the path which we love to travel in the interior and ideal world; and sometimes, no doubt, we find it difficult to choose our direction, because it does not yet exist distinctly in our idea....   When I go out of the house for a walk, uncertain as yet whither I will bend my steps, and submit myself to my instinct to decide for me...

If you decide to take me up on the suggestion of taking a walk in Nature, your assignment is to come back and discuss your walk and how your experience resonates (or doesn't) with that described in Thoreau's "Walking."  If you decide not to take me up on the suggestion of taking a walk in Nature, then I want you to discuss why you hesitated or why you didn't take the walk. [Make sure to note that taking the walk will net you not only credit for this week's assignment but extra-credit was well.  See Extra Credit tab for the details.  To get extra-credit, post to your blog a review of your walk with pictures.]  

Regardless, as part of your post to the discussion thread, I want you to discuss your relationship with Nature, and the role it has played in discovering who you are and in, as Thoreau would say, living deliberately.  As you do, remember Romantics, like Thoreau and Poe, were all about getting in touch with your intuition, imagination, and feelings.  Nature was a key to getting a handle on your best self and the sublime.  Nature and self were seen by most as a path to the Romantic Sublime and, through intense feeling, the ability to feel for others and your self.  To modern ears, this sounds a tad "touchy feelly," but one possibility this week would be to talk about how you feel about Nature, how you felt on your walk, why you feel the way you do or did; or, if you didn't take the walk, if your feelings about Nature or walking had anything to do with your choice.  Another tactic for the discussion would be to compare your take on Nature with that offered by Emerson and Thoreau.

Note: Choosing to get out in Nature is a great opportunity to garner some extra credit.  This is a great opportunity to get together with your group or with two or more members of the class and plan an extra-credit day trip to take a a walk in nature and discuss Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Nature, and Romanticism.

Note:  As always when participating in the discussion forum, quality, quantity, and frequency of posts are the key to getting the best class participation grade.  Another key to a high grade is to focus the discussion on and use the reading in your posts to the forum and the blog. Use the chapter and the essay we read this week in your essay, and don't just use the first couple of pages.   Remember, you don't have to be formal when discussing literature; in fact, the best conversations about the literature are informal and grounded in relating the literature to everyday experience.  The final and, perhaps, the most important key is to write posts which get other students to think and engage the literature, the ideas being discussed, and you.  
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Romantic Sublime and Nature

Cynthia
As a crystal stream that runs down the mountain and the plain, so is its intelligence. How beautiful and fragrant flowers, so are its qualities, to distinguish themselves from each other. How tasty fruit trees or the rain clouds generous, so are your dreams are realized in good things. And as the sun, so is life inside you. Life and meaning, outside and inside of you. The beauty of nature is close to the inner beauty that lies within you.
It is an explosion of creativity and energy flow that is above man. If we stop to analyze what is nature we gasp in nature there so many species of animals and plants more than we ever imagine. Nature is air, rivers, lakes, plants and especially water.

I based my writing in an experience I had when I was 8th grade. We had this field trip to an amazing city, where people breath nature. We had walking, visit to caverns, rivers and the one that most amazed me it was when we went down to see a water reserve of crystal blue water, the most beautiful thing I have ever seen. That experience brought me close to our environment. During ours day-to-day activities we forget to give the nature some attention, but any action, like throwing the trash in the basket case, using less water bottles, riding with friends or friends riding with you, to put less cars in circulation and this way try to make the air we breath less polluted, all this small things can help the world. If each of us make a little bit will count a lot.
That is just my point of view. I believe that if we preserve our nature we can take advantage of it for many and many years, we can interact with it and learn from it! That's how I find myself, the singing of birds, the sunset and in my case, I trade the woods by the sound of the sea.

I work full-time (7:30am-5:30pm) Mon-Fr, so I planned in going to Deep Run Park, close to my house,  tomorrow (Saturday), but unfortunately the flu got me and I cannot go anywhere. I even had to come home early from work today. That is why I decided to do my writing in an experience I had in the past, but that was unforgettable.
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Ben Morgan
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
To me, nature has a way of arousing feelings and emotion that cannot be aroused anywhere else. I feel small, I feel inadequate, I have questions, I wonder at designs, I wonder at functions, I stand in awe.  I have always enjoyed nature from the time I was young. I can think of countless hours spent running around and building forts, teepees, and using my imagination with items from nature. I can think of many other hours spent gardening and mending to the grass and surrounding. And still to this day, I enjoy spending time out doors. I feel as if you can always learn something new or be challenged to think in ways that we don’t find ourselves thinking as we lead our habitual respective lives.
This past week I took a walk in my neighborhood and decided to walk down a path that I knew had a stream running alongside. About halfway through my walk, when I could see no more housing around, I sat down off the path next to the stream. I took a moment to listen to the water moving. I listened for the splashing patter as water collided against rocks and fallen branches. I then looked to the sky and saw the blue sky shining through the bare tree branches. I then looked at the tree I was leaning against at the time. I wondered how old it was. I thought about which seed had planted it. I thought about how the stream provided water for it. I thought of how many storms it had been through. And I thought most of how it had never once moved locations. It sat, steadfast no matter what. I won’t lie; I had to stop thinking for a time. I was overwhelmed with questions and feelings. I was in awe and amazement of how things came to be and function. I think this is the feeling that Henry David Thoreau expressed in his essay, “Walking”. I believe the out of mind experience can be healthy and therapeutic, especially in the day and age we live in now. I think moments to go and rest and just enjoy this world we live in is important. To pay attention to our surroundings and rest.
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Sam Coleman
I'm typically hesitant to go out into nature, not because I don't enjoy it, but mostly out of sheer laziness. I know that might sound bad, well actually it is. Nine times out of ten I prefer to sit around reading or play FIFA than to go outside and go for I hike. I find the same difficulty when I'm encouraged to go exercise or play sports, for me most of the time the level of enjoyment is not worth removing myself from bed. But on the other hand when I do get out there, I usually love it, I don't believe in traditional meditation, but I find that I have a similar feeling if I walk by myself in nature. There are few things that I have seen that have that powerful of an effect on me. Also, when in the right mindset, hiking, fishing, and kayaking tend to be some of my favorite activities. I don't consider myself a romantic, but when I am somewhere that is aesthetically beautiful, I find hard not to let that side of me out. There is nothing like true wilderness, that can even come close to giving me those feelings. But again it can sometimes be difficult to get into the mindset. At the end of the day there is no euphoria comparable to kayaking through the everglades or climbing to the summit of Mount Washington. I feel grateful for the experiences that I have had and if I can muster up the energy I plan to continue the excursions.
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Preston Tran
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
I agree with Sam completely, It is not my lack of love for nature but my laziness that prevents me from being with nature, this is strange because I love nature. I live in the city so I am not close to any parks or and any kinda of wilderness. I regret that i am not close to any wilderness, because my family used to live out in Rockville Manacan where our closest neighbor was 5 acres away. We were surrounded by endless woods, creeks, lakes, and acres of fields. I loved taking walks in the woods with my dogs.
This week I went to Maymont park and walked in the Japanese gardens. I walked through the bamboo forests, sat a little while listening to the animals and birds that i heard. After that I went to the waterfall and sat near it and watched some fish swimming in the pound that ran from the waterfall. I agree with Ben morgan as I sat near the waterfall I experienced the feeling that Henry David Thoreau was talking about in his essay, “Walking”. I believe the out of mind experience can be healthy and therapeutic, especially in the day and age we live in now. I think moments to go and rest and just enjoy this world we live in is important. To pay attention to our surroundings and rest.
I am thankful for the reminder to go outside, it has reminded me how much I missed be surrounded by nature. How much I missed be outside and hear the sounds of nature instead of sounds of the city.
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

kevcon27
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
I have had the great pleasure of going from corner to corner on this great country.  I have been to the glaciers of Alaska.  I have seen the beauty this is the northern lights.  I have walked the Grand Canyon; I have stood in awe of Niagara Falls.  In all of these situations I have seen the truly magnificent.  It’s impossible to not feel like a speck of dirt in many of these places.  I remember seeing the udder devastation after Mount Saint Helens erupted.  The raw power of the eruption has never left me.  There was a quiet and peaceful calm when I looked at miles of trees blown down like match sticks.  This past weekend several members of my committee and I went to Belle Isle.  We walked the trail.  It was a beautiful Saturday.  The wind was a bit biting.  We took the right side of the path first and followed the loop.  We stopped several times to take in the beauty of the rapids.  I couldn't help but feel a small amount of pain as I looked at the James River and noticed how low the water was.  We walked the isle and as we were leaving I took the group to my favorite place on the island.  It's at the southeastern tip.  It's a small sandy beach isolated for the rest of the island.  I often in the spring like to go watch the water pass by.  I try to go there and leave my problems there to wash down the James.  This is a place I' am able to take all the nature around me and appreciate it.  I enjoyed sharing this with the group and the discussion board.
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Roland Simmons
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Rich Sena
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
I jumped all over this because I dont have a car. Not out of court restriction, I just sold my car before I moved down here. I live in the city, work in the city and go to school in the city so it almost makes no sense to drive. I love to walk, I love the solitude, along with the feeling of being a part of a pulse of what goes on around you. As far as the nature walk part there are parks that I walk through but I like the scenescape of trees to buildings that Richmond has. I like the humbling aspect as well, the other people with places to go, or the huge buildings, or the trees and space around us. A constant reminder that we are individuals, individuals that are part of something. A person and random face all at once. The anonymity and exclusivity all at once. Its a great feeling to be out and part of something, and its great to go out and be the only person when the magnetism draws us away to reflect on those things that we must learn of ourselves, by ourselves
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Kendall Plummer
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
One of our assignments this week asked us to take a walk in nature, away from the busy life. I actually went for a run instead. We're scheduled to run every Saturday morning and I knew that after that run I would not be willing to go for a walk or hike of any sort. For part of the run, I didn't listen to any music and I didn't get near anyone to talk to them as a distraction. During that time it was difficult because I am used to running with someone and having that support beside me. At the same time, it was quiet and I could listen to all the natural sounds coming from around me. I heard the usual birds and wind that everyone is going to mention. There were also car sounds and people on bikes. But what I noticed was that the people I passed were all doing something. No one was just sitting, enjoying life. People were driving, running, biking, walking dogs, etc. The point is they were all "going"...somewhere. Then I thought about how I was running. That's "going" too. I enjoyed the breeze and the natural sounds, but it wasn't relaxing, it wasn't getting close to nature. Everyone's lives are so filled with things to do, and places to go. I don't think anyone really stops to think or feel what is really going on around them, or what is going on with themselves. All the things I saw people doing could be stress relievers, but they were still going. I thought about how it seems as everyone runs  through life and doesn't take time to appreciate things. There are people who would love the opportunity to be able to walk or run, but they are physically incapable. Yet, they probably enjoy and appreciate life more than we do. It's a challenge in today's world to be able to take time and just enjoy life, but I think it's important for us to take that time in order to grasp that full meaning of life. :)
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Charlie Smoak
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
I didn't go out for the assignment because, of course, I looked at the assignments at the last minute and it got cold and dark outside. When I lived in Northern Virginia, my friends and I used to go camping and to the Potomac river a lot for fun, so I have many experiences in nature. My favorite park in nova was definitely Difficult Run, which is rock cliffs on the Potomac river that you can climb, or you could go swimming, fishing or kayaking. Being alone in nature brings a very strange yet natural feeling to you. The feeling is a very thought provoking state of mind. The thoughts are mostly about life and why we're here and what our purpose is. In my experiences I've come to realize that human beings over complicate life. We created an economic system, and stress out about money. Money technically doesn't really exist, its just that accept it that it matters, and it is a huge cause of human stress and anxiety. To me, people live an "artificial life", if you will. Other animals just eat, reproduce and survive, which could probably the meaning of life. Being in nature is also really relaxing. The white noise of a river, the birds chirping, and the wrestling of the leaves in the trees is a noise that brings me to a very content relaxed state of mind.                          
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Jeff Ruark
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
I wasn't able to get out into nature this week due to what seemed to be a relentless schedule, but when I first went to college in Tennessee there was a place called Pocket Wilderness about fifteen minutes from campus.  It truly is one of the most beautiful places I've ever been in my life, and I happy that I was able to go there on almost a weekly basis.  One of my favorite memories was going camping with the guys that lived on my hall.  My roommate and I set up our tent on the edge of a fifteen foot rock that sat above the crashing river rapids.  I remember sitting outside of our tent in the middle of the night just listening to everything that was going on around us.  We couldn't see a thing, but as time went on, nature revealed it's natural rhythm.  The sounds of the wildlife started to sound like a repeating song, and the crashing rapids below maintained the same beat all night as they flowed violently around the rocks.  It was one of the most peaceful nights of my life, even though one could say it was the loudest.  I felt like I had everything I needed out there.  I hope to spend another night at Pocket the next time I return to Tennessee.
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Roland Simmons
In reply to this post by Roland Simmons
Nature has always been apart of my feeling and emotions that I can remember every sense I was a child.  Not only did the flowers and trees get my attention but so did the animals and insects.  When I think of nature I feel Gods creation all around me.  Going back to when I was a kid in elementary school going on field trips to the parks and historical places.  Sometimes we would just go to the woods edge to see how tall the trees were and the animals that lived in them.  As I got older nature had a different meaning because I started going places that gave me more to look for in my surroundings.  Going to the park with my girlfriend I didn't look for insects and animals, but I looked at the flowers and how it made the land look beautiful and gave me memories of good times.  Traveling while in the military I was able to experience nature from different parts of the world.  I was station in Hamburg west Germany, and other parts of Germany that I visited was a experience that I will never forget.  Today I still take walks in the park looking in the ponds seeing the changes in the landscape and imagining that nature has its beauty no matter what the surroundings.
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Mintina Minto
In reply to this post by Roland Simmons
My experience was a little different I got to see nature through the eyes of a child. My child had never seen a duck up close and personal. He was so happy to identify with the creature we sing about in childrens songs and watch on his videos. He pointed to the birds in the sky and watched them in awe.
Watching him enjoy nature I felt overwhelmed with joy. Our journey took us to Three Lakes Park. We walked the trail and then stopped and sat on the bench and ate . I enjoyed explaining everything to him and he seemed to listen avidly.He was trying to absorb everything around him. My problem with nature is bugs. This time of year is perfect for me due to the limited amount of bugs.We watched birds and saw stuff stirring in the water and causing a rippple effect.We ended our date at the playground that was adjacent to the trail. Our morning was one to remember. Perfect date and humbling scenery who could ask for anything more. Thanks Professor for the nudge to experience and appreciate nature.
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Antonio Lewis
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
I did not go for a walk through nature for this assignment.  I did however go for a jog, if that counts for anything.  I probably should have taken the walk since it has been a long time since I've simply taken a stroll through nature.  For some reason I could not bring myself to a walking pace, except for cooling down.  I guess it's because I ran track in high school and continue to jog to keep in shape for military PT tests.  I guess I really can't see the health benefit of walking although its not physically possible for us to be able run constantly.  I promise that before this month is over, I will find a quiet destination away from the fast paced city life in Washington D.C. and walk it.  This weekend would be perfect because I am taking a mini vacation to Boston.  It is a city full of historic value and there are tours which I plan on embarking on that require plenty of walking.  It won't be very quiet because there will be a tour guide talking and others along with me, but its a start.  I hope to bring back lots of new insight.  
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Sha Trent
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
I decided to take 'the walk' in Richmond and along Interstate 64 West (Richmond to Staunton Interstate 81). I visited two parks on Sunday, as it was warm and absolutely the best day to spend time in and with Nature.
 
First, I went to Bryant Park in Richmond's Northside. I frequently visit Bryant Park to play tennis with my best friend, Helga. On most Thursdays, we'd get together and play tennis for hours, never bothering to admire the various forms of beauty the park offers. On Sunday, my visit elicited so much beauty, even during Winter. Amazingly, one of the things I noticed, as with the other parks I visited that day...was that most of the trees had leaves. I was left to wonder if parks purposely plant trees that have leaves year round to preserve the solice that is provided there. Despite being a city girl, I've always had an affinity for trees. I've always had a tremendous love, respect and appreciation for them as they have so many significant apparent purposes, although I'm still uncertain of my own. Trees provide so much while alive: shelter, animal habitats, protection and most important for us, oxygen. I also, noticed that there is a little stream or brook there, that I had never noticed en route to the courts. There were huge boulders and stones along the water, giving it a true feeling of 'outside'. I say this because I find that in our fake, modern society, almost everything we consider to be beautiful, is based upon and mimicking nature. We buy things to help us make the indoors emulate the outdoors (fountains, trees, clocks with natural sounds, sky lights, etc.) And I believe that we practice such fallacy because we are naturally drawn to the peacefulness that nature provides us, yet we're too caught up in destroying it to partake in our own personal gain to truly care for and appreciate it personally. The sounds of the brook and rustling trees were literally music to my ears. I was able to close my eyes and see what exactly what I was hearing and open them and not see my television staring back at me with a picture of natural scenery.

Next, very briefly, I visited Byrd Park. I simply sat in a small field of trees between both lakes, (Swan lake and one with the big fountain). I wasn't very quiet, as there were alot of people out enjoying the weather, but it was very comfortable and presented an atmosphere that was calm and deliberate. The wildlife (ducks, pigeons, squirrels and etc.) were confident and easy going, thus corraborating how natural it really is, despite being located in a capital city. Although, I dared not attempt to grab a wild animal, I found comfort in hugging a tree. I feel that Thoreau was really completely in tuned with nature, especially when stating that his life amongst free birds was like him being in a cage, in their world.

Following, Byrd Park, I decided to take a drive to the mountains. As always, I'm amazed at how beautiful the world is and can be. I visited there back in April, and it never seems to look different, with the exception of the multitude of colors in Autumn. Despite my fault for verbosity, I find that there aren't very many words to describe the drive accept, that it gave me a sense of overwhelming love for Mother Earth and her many blessings, contributions and marvels. It never ceases to amaze me how pretty nature always is. I find it hard to not wish that I could be as flawless and beautiful...naturally.
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correction to paragraph 3-"Thoreau was completely in tune..."

Sha Trent
I decided to take 'the walk' in Richmond and along Interstate 64 West (Richmond to Staunton Interstate 81). I visited two parks on Sunday, as it was warm and absolutely the best day to spend time in and with Nature.
 
First, I went to Bryant Park in Richmond's Northside. I frequently visit Bryant Park to play tennis with my best friend, Helga. On most Thursdays, we'd get together and play tennis for hours, never bothering to admire the various forms of beauty the park offers. On Sunday, my visit elicited so much beauty, even during Winter. Amazingly, one of the things I noticed, as with the other parks I visited that day...was that most of the trees had leaves. I was left to wonder if parks purposely plant trees that have leaves year round to preserve the solice that is provided there. Despite being a city girl, I've always had an affinity for trees. I've always had a tremendous love, respect and appreciation for them as they have so many significant apparent purposes, although I'm still uncertain of my own. Trees provide so much while alive: shelter, animal habitats, protection and most important for us, oxygen. I also, noticed that there is a little stream or brook there, that I had never noticed en route to the courts. There were huge boulders and stones along the water, giving it a true feeling of 'outside'. I say this because I find that in our fake, modern society, almost everything we consider to be beautiful, is based upon and mimicking nature. We buy things to help us make the indoors emulate the outdoors (fountains, trees, clocks with natural sounds, sky lights, etc.) And I believe that we practice such fallacy because we are naturally drawn to the peacefulness that nature provides us, yet we're too caught up in destroying it to partake in our own personal gain to truly care for and appreciate it personally. The sounds of the brook and rustling trees were literally music to my ears. I was able to close my eyes and see what exactly what I was hearing and open them and not see my television staring back at me with a picture of natural scenery.

Next, very briefly, I visited Byrd Park. I simply sat in a small field of trees between both lakes, (Swan lake and one with the big fountain). I wasn't very quiet, as there were alot of people out enjoying the weather, but it was very comfortable and presented an atmosphere that was calm and deliberate. The wildlife (ducks, pigeons, squirrels and etc.) were confident and easy going, thus corraborating how natural it really is, despite being located in a capital city. Although, I dared not attempt to grab a wild animal, I found comfort in hugging a tree. I feel that Thoreau was completely in tune with nature, especially when stating that his life amongst free birds was like him being in a cage, in their world.

Following, Byrd Park, I decided to take a drive to the mountains. As always, I'm amazed at how beautiful the world is and can be. I visited there back in April, and it never seems to look different, with the exception of the multitude of colors in Autumn. Despite my fault for verbosity, I find that there aren't very many words to describe the drive accept, that it gave me a sense of overwhelming love for Mother Earth and her many blessings, contributions and marvels. It never ceases to amaze me how pretty nature always is. I find it hard to not wish that I could be as flawless and beautiful...naturally.
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Woubet Gebreab: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Woubet Gebreab
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Woubet Gebreab: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Woubet Gebreab
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon

I went out for a walk to Deep Run Park on Sunday afternoon.  The Weather was very comfortable except a little windy but it is normal for the season.  It is warming up and the start of Spring and an ending Winter.  My plan was to go to the GYM and workout but since i wanted to enjoy the outdoors i made arrangement to after my walk in the park.  I was delighted and happy that i went for a walk.  I usually go to Byrd Park but since Deep run is closer i went there.  It is a little different environment and experience than Byrd Park even though there are similar things involved.  

I walked by the lake and looked at the Ducks and Birds and listened to their voices and sounds.  I walked around the walking trial and noticed some kids with their parents playing at the playgrounds, basket ball court family playing in group, some individuals walking exercising, walking their dogs.  Since it is Valentine's day weekend there were some couples sitting and eating or walking holding hands.  It is a nice environment to feel the romance and love as a family or couple.  I sat down for a little while and took some pictures of the natural environment surrounding me.  I always love to take pictures of nature and admired the works of art whether it is the river, lake, sunset and sunrise and plants.  I Was at home all day trying to read online but getting out was a true great idea.  It gave me energy and motivation for my GYM workout.  I will do this more often since the weather is really nice.
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Re: Woubet Gebreab: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Anthony Rinaldi
Though I made a big deal about heading out west to Crabtree Falls during last weeks class, I of course was unable to go. Not surprising in the least. Oh, well... Next time I'm out thataways, I'll be sure to go. So, I decided after Church on Sunday to head to the next best thing: Dorey Park out in Varina. It was quite the georgeous day and would have been great walking in Carytown, let alone a wonderful park in rural Henrico!

For sure, I did experience that Sublime feeling, mostly because of the clear blue sky and wonderful weather. For me, I think the fast key to the sublime is weather. Get that right and almost anything else can be glossed over as mere details.
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Re: Week Five Discussion: Walking, Nature, and the Romantic Sublime

Kristi Kesler
In reply to this post by Dr. Brandon
I agree with Sam in terms of laziness keeps me indoors.  I typically stay indoors due to my busy life of two jobs and full time school.  The majority of my outdoors time is either when I play softball in the spring and during my racing season.  From time to time I will venture out at my parents house in Jetersville and ride four wheelers for the day.  The nature at my parents is similar to that I experience at my racing weekends of camping in the woods.  It’s so tranquil and relaxing.  Many people don’t realize how much nature has to offer.  It’s interesting how something so simple can easily relax you after a stressful day.  Also, I have found when I am out enjoying nature with someone close to me it definitely gives you that romanticism feel…even when not intending to.  Some of my greatest memories are from relaxing in nature with my friends and family on a cool summer night reminiscing about past experiences of doing the exact same thing.  I think nature, whether time spent alone or in the company of others, can provide relaxation as well as appreciation for the beauty of nature that we all seem to overlook on a daily basis.
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